On the Surface

ONLY IN NEW YORK

May 10, 2016
       
Whitney Museum

East Side, West Side, all around the town…there’s inspiration everywhere in the City that’s never sleepy, always open to new discoveries. Start your search in some of the world’s most exciting museums. Here’s what’s playing where during SURTEX:

Whitney Museum of American Art, New York’s Newest, 99 Gansevoort St., the building by Renzo Piano is worth the trip down to the Meatpacking District (not to mention two restaurants by NY’s beloved Danny Meyer, one on the roof for a great view of the world’s longest park, the elevated High Line that runs all the way to W. 34th St.). New at the Whitney: “Mirror Cells,” works by five sculptors, all women, all unpredictable.

The Met Breuer, New York’s Second Newest, 945 Madison Ave. The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s paean to contemporary, housed in the former Whitney Museum building by Marcel Breuer. Now showing “Unfinished: Thoughts Left Visible,” 197 works from the Renaissance to today that were never completed by artists from Titian and Rembrandt to Picasso, Rauschenberg, and Pollack (who could tell?).

Museum of Arts & Design

Metropolitan Museum of Art, Fifth Ave @ 82nd: “Manus x Machina,” just opened with much fanfare in the Costume Institute. Explores “Fashion in the Age of Technology” — 3D printing, laser cutting, untrasonic welding, like that. Also playing: (until May 15) “Vigee Le Brun,” woman portraitist who painted famous figures in French Revolutionary times, including Marie Antoinnette. Also, “Pergamon: Hellenistic Kingdoms of the Ancient World.”

MoMA (Museum of Modern Art), 11 W. 53rd. “Edgar Degas: A Strange New Beauty.” The Mega Impressionist at his most experimental; 100+ rarely seen monotypes — 50 related paintings, drawings, sketchbooks & prints.

MAD (Museum of Art & Design): 2 Columbus Circle. Studio Job MAD House, furniture, sculpture, lighting, floorcovering and such by collaborators Job Smeets (Belgian) and Nynke Tynagel (Dutch). Celebrates these enfants terribles’ commitment to craftsmanship in the applied arts, such as bronze casting, fiance, marquetry, stained glass.